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Check out this video of a huge wind turbine blade traversing a narrow mountain road in China – but you might want to watch through your fingers.

The Telegraph in the UK posted footage, which it credits to Three Gorges/AsiaWire, of a wind turbine blade being slowly transported in, erm, rather challenging conditions in Sichuan, and it’s just too good not to share:

The wind turbine blade is extremely heavy and long: it’s 19 tonnes (nearly 42,000 pounds) and 75 meters (246 feet) long.

Apparently it takes two weeks for each blade to be transported up the route. The Telegraph writes that the delivery team has to deal with “extreme cold and altitude sickness as well as heavy storms and snow.” Respect, delivery team. I hope they get overtime.

We’ll be keeping an eye out for the final destination of this blade, as we want to see the finished result.

And if you didn’t know this already, China is the world wind leader, with over 25% of the world’s wind power capacity. (The US is No. 2.)

Read more: A Danish wind turbine giant just discovered how to recycle all blades

Photo: Three Gorges/AsiaWire


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Michelle Lewis

Michelle Lewis is a writer and editor on Electrek and an editor on DroneDJ, 9to5Mac, and 9to5Google. She lives in White River Junction, Vermont. She has previously worked for Fast Company, the Guardian, News Deeply, Time, and others. Message Michelle on Twitter or at michelle@9to5mac.com. Check out her personal blog.


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